Archive for the ‘watches’ Category

February 28, 2010

Radio Shack has an interesting Weather Radio with AM/FM for Skywarn folks.

Since Jackson County has a grant to get a 75% rebate on the purchase of a new weather radio with SAME technology, it was not hard to say “yes”.

The radio has an amazing additional feature. It’s a scanner for two-meter and 440 mHz Skywarn channels, programmable. That’s 20 channels for the local Skywarn enthusiast.

The radio specifications list .3 microvolt for both the weather radio and Skywarn band. That’s not great sensitivity but locally it works to hear the local Skywarn repeaters and the County NWS transmitter, with the telescoping antenna collapsed and folded into storage.

Reading the reviews on the Radio Shack site, some complaints are:

low sensitivity
can’t program a local Skywarn channel
no balance in audio between bands

One EXCELLENT feature is the BNC antenna adapter that comes with the radio. This makes having an outside antenna to improve reception of both weather and amateur radio signals.

Overall, this is a good unit, especially if you live in Jackson County, OK and are involved in the Skywarn Program.

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February 12, 2009

http://blogs.woodtv.com/2009/02/11/tornadoes-in-oklahoma/ is a work about the Lone Grove, OK tornado of February, 2009.

One of the quotes in the comments involved a trucker’s wife. Seems she is happy her husband is out of the State.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090211/ap_on_re_us/severe_weather reports a … “trucker driving through town was also killed when winds slammed into his rig”.

That produces thought that truckers need the same warning the rest of us get. How do they get warnings?

http://truckerweatherwatch.org/ is the Trucker’s Weather Watch. It’s a site founded “by Sean Kiaer of Everett, Wa. on October 12 2006 to integrate the Trucking industry in to the National Weather Service’s Severe Weather Reporting Network, known as SKYWARN™.

Folks who go to Skywarn training regularly hear “never try to outrun a tornado”.

As one puzzles over how to get information into the trucks of the trucking industry, remember, in Oklahoma, at truck stops, the National Weather Service NOAA weather radio is played in the background in the rest rooms. Rather than MUZAK, the weather radio provides potentially lifesaving information.

Some, though not all, use Citizen Band radios with weather radios incorporated in them. Some relay on the goodness of dispatchers, friends, and truck stops to keep them informed of weather.

Of course, others are amateur radio operators. Those that travel the highways frequently, along the same route, have the active repeaters programmed into their radios.

Some use their cell phones, if they have a relative or friend in some sort of emergency management or weather service.

Some, it is feared, have nothing.

This is one of the reasons why Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) is so important. Can a system be developed to get the life-saving message into the hands of those that need it, before they need it?