Archive for the ‘IPAWS’ Category

Help Shape the CMAS Research Agenda — Online Forum live thru March 9

March 8, 2012
On behalf of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate, I would like to invite you to help shape the research and development agenda for the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS).

As you may know, the rollout of CMAS will begin in April of this year. Once it is rolled out, CMAS will allow alerting authorities at different levels of government to send text-like alerts to the public via wireless devices based on geographic location. As CMAS becomes operational across the country, the research and development of this system will be important in ensuring CMAS is as effective as possible and continues to evolve to meet the needs of practitioners like you. From today until March 16th, the CMAS Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT&E) Program is hosting an online discussion to bring practitioner input into the CMAS research and development agenda, specifically in the fields of geo-targeting of CMAS alerts and understanding public response to CMAS messages. (More information about CMAS is at the bottom of this email.)

The discussion will be online 24/7 for your input. Your participation will help us craft a research agenda around these questions:

·         For CMAS to be effective, what do we need to know about how the public responds to mobile alerts?
·         What are the key questions that should guide CMAS research and development in geo-targeting of mobile alerts?

On this online forum, you can rate existing focus areas developed by the CMAS RDT&E Program, refine ideas in open discussion with other practitioners, and submit your own ideas for research questions that should be explored.

Log on now and help shape the CMAS research agenda

Building a research agenda that is in line with the needs of the public safety community requires the input of practitioners like you. So please log on and help inform the research objectives of CMAS, and feel free to forward this to those in your network whose perspectives should be heard. If you have any questions, please contact CMAS_Forum@sra.com.

Regards,

Denis Gusty
Program Manager
Office of Interoperability & Compatibility
U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Science and Technology Directorate

CMAS Background
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) envisions a future where all Americans are able to receive accurate alerts and warnings, regardless of communications technology used.  This vision is being achieved through the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS).  IPAWS is a modernization and integration of the Nation’s alert and warning infrastructure.  It integrates new and existing public alert and warning systems and technologies.  In partnership with DHS Science and Technology Directorate (S&T), IPAWS is working to incorporate wireless mobile alerts through the Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS).  This inclusion is an acknowledgement of the important role that wireless technologies play in Americans’ lives today.  Given the wide use of wireless mobile devices, CMAS will help ensure more people receive actionable alerts to help avoid danger or respond more quickly during crisis—thereby saving lives and property. 

CMAS—developed and tested by FEMA and S&T—is one of the major components of IPAWS.  The CMAS component will provide an interface to participating cellular mobile service providers for delivery of critical alert information to cellular phones in a danger zone.  Specifically, the CMAS capability will provide local, tribal, state, territorial, and Federal government officials the ability to send 90-character, geographically-targeted text alerts to the public.

For more background on CMAS, visit the CMAS RDT&E Online Forum.

CMAS Forum #SMEM #IPAWS

February 7, 2012

The Science and Technology Directorate within the U.S. Department of Homeland Security is hosting
a Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS) Forum on February 21, in Las Vegas. This CMAS Forum
provides stakeholders nationwide with a unique opportunity to discuss CMAS research, development,
and testing in advance of CMAS deployment in April.

The CMAS Forum is designed to address current and future-state initiatives to advance CMAS
capabilities nationwide. Information gathered will guide efforts for future CMAS planning, including
standards development and emerging technologies. The CMAS Forum will take place at the Las Vegas
Convention Center, Room S226, in conjunction with the International Wireless Communications Expo,
from 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM PST.

The discussions and partnerships developed at the CMAS Forum will outline specific actions needed for
preparing communities for CMAS and will advance alerts and warnings capabilities nationwide, enhance
vital partnerships, and lay the groundwork for future success.

REGISTRATION AND HOTEL

Participants can register to attend the CMAS Forum by completing the attached registration form
and sending it to CMAS_Forum@sra.com. By registering via the attached form, participants will
automatically be registered for IWCE’s exhibit hall at no charge. Participants who wish to attend the full
IWCE conference should mention the CMAS Forum and code H28 when registering for IWCE to receive
25% off IWCE conference prices.

IWCE has arranged for reduced hotel rates, which are available on a first-come first-served basis. To
learn more about hotel and travel options when planning your attendance at the CMAS Forum, please
visit IWCE for information about rates and procedures for reserving a hotel room.

June 13, 2011

In the USA, for someone to say they did not get a warning is essentially to say “I did not want a warning.”

Emergency Managers, for years, have encouraged the Citizen to be more  active in getting their warning information.  The days of the siren to wake us up in the middle of the night is over.  As one emergency manager pointed out:  When I was MUCH younger, the windows were open in the spring, the blackandwhite TV was not on all the time, folks did not listen to MP3 players with headphones, and sirens could be heard inside the house.

http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=kc5fm-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B002WFJEJY&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifrToday’s more mobile world calls for 24-seven news and 24-seven warning systems.  Trained professionals have learned not to count on just one system.

With the cell phone tied to every waistband, some jurisdictions are turning to products such as Nixle, BlackboardConnect, MyStateUSA, Code Red, and EmergencyE to encourage the public to get their warnings.

Popular smartphone operating systems such as the Android and Iphone offer applications such as WeatherBug that automatically alert when the resident is in a warning area as well as for areas where the Citizen has an interest.

The Weather Service has offered Interactive NWS for a few years now.  This service sends email and text messages to subscribers (who are members of the emergency management community).  This supplements the Weather Radio network that has been in place for a number of years.http://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=kc5fm-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B000O1QZW2&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Of course, amateur radio plays a big part in keeping the resident aware as do local media partners.  Even newspapers are joining the electronic media to give their own Twitter and Facebook information. 

In time, you may get automated information from your Federal partners with the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS).

Indeed, today, there’s no need to go without a warning.  However, you must WANT to get one.



February 12, 2009

http://blogs.woodtv.com/2009/02/11/tornadoes-in-oklahoma/ is a work about the Lone Grove, OK tornado of February, 2009.

One of the quotes in the comments involved a trucker’s wife. Seems she is happy her husband is out of the State.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090211/ap_on_re_us/severe_weather reports a … “trucker driving through town was also killed when winds slammed into his rig”.

That produces thought that truckers need the same warning the rest of us get. How do they get warnings?

http://truckerweatherwatch.org/ is the Trucker’s Weather Watch. It’s a site founded “by Sean Kiaer of Everett, Wa. on October 12 2006 to integrate the Trucking industry in to the National Weather Service’s Severe Weather Reporting Network, known as SKYWARN™.

Folks who go to Skywarn training regularly hear “never try to outrun a tornado”.

As one puzzles over how to get information into the trucks of the trucking industry, remember, in Oklahoma, at truck stops, the National Weather Service NOAA weather radio is played in the background in the rest rooms. Rather than MUZAK, the weather radio provides potentially lifesaving information.

Some, though not all, use Citizen Band radios with weather radios incorporated in them. Some relay on the goodness of dispatchers, friends, and truck stops to keep them informed of weather.

Of course, others are amateur radio operators. Those that travel the highways frequently, along the same route, have the active repeaters programmed into their radios.

Some use their cell phones, if they have a relative or friend in some sort of emergency management or weather service.

Some, it is feared, have nothing.

This is one of the reasons why Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) is so important. Can a system be developed to get the life-saving message into the hands of those that need it, before they need it?